Our View Logo 2020

COVID-19 has affected just about everything in American life, and that includes the upcoming election. While there has been a general trend toward having fewer people run for the unpaid seats on school boards, the difficulty in circulating petitions this year has exaggerated that. Now a number of people are running for the two Casa Grande boards as write-ins, although some candidates got on the ballot. In some cases, they were able to navigate the process of gathering signatures by mail, sending the proper forms and instructions and paying for postage.

For the Casa Grande Union High School District board, Jack Henness was appointed to a vacant seat and was the only one to file for the remaining two years of the term. Because of that, he is not on the ballot. He served capably before, and his return is a service to the district. For three other seats, the candidates are real estate agent Kelly Herrington, Chandler teacher Taylor Kerby, restaurateur Tom McGill and designer and incumbent Chuck Wright. Of those, Kerby and McGill are write-in candidates, so voters will have to remember their names. We are endorsing Herrington, Wright and McGill because of their ideas about the district and business experience.

In the Casa Grande Elementary School District, the candidates are retired teacher and farmer Nancy Caywood, power plant manager David Sancic, senior citizens adviser Adelphia Sisson and retired county planner Jerry Stabley. The only one on the ballot is Stabley. We are endorsing Stabley, Sisson and Caywood because of their ideas and record of public service.

These positions are important but often thankless. All those running for these and other districts, including those who made the effort to file as write-ins, should be commended. Voters should make the small effort needed to fill in some of these names where they see blank lines on the ballot.

School districts, including Florence, Santa Cruz Valley Union High, Stanfield, Toltec and Superior, have budget override or bond questions on the ballot. Districts depend on these funds to provide basic services, and residents should consider a yes vote.

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