NASCAR, a vital part of Southern culture, has prohibited the display of the Confederate flag at NASCAR events. That flag is not the banner of the Confederate States of America, it is the Confederate battle flag, which was unfurled as Confederate forces attacked legitimate Federal forces, and invaded Maryland and Pennsylvania. These were acts of treason. Supporters of the Confederate flag claim it is a symbol of heritage, yet that heritage is one of slavery, insurrection, defiance, segregation and lynching. Just in case you still favor the display of this flag, you should know that in Germany where the Nazi swastika is forbidden, white supremacist groups display the Confederate flag.

How about those statues of Confederate generals that some want torn down? Perhaps there is an easy manner to deal with these statues. Instead of removing them, simply erect a statue of Benedict Arnold adjacent to the Confederate general. Arnold was a hero for the Continental Army. His victory at Saratoga was a key to France granting military and financial support to the revolting American colonies. When the Continental Congress failed to reward Arnold with the promotion and funds he believed he deserved, he switched sides and became a traitor, much like Lee, Jackson, Bragg, etc.

Instead of a boulevard of heroes, there can be an avenue of treason. In addition to Arnold, statues of the leaders of failed slave revolts can be located alongside the Southern generals.

Then we have the problem of Army bases named after Confederate generals. Over the years, the names of bases have been changed, so that is not a problem. Do most soldiers who have served at Fort Bragg or Fort Benning know for whom the base is named? While serving in the USAF, I was stationed at bases named Connally, Mather, Castle, Beale, Griffiss, Stead and Andersen. To this day, I have no idea who these men were, nor did I care.

There are financial consequences if names of military posts are changed. Think of the road signs and street names which must be changed, then consider the cost of new letterhead. Perhaps a soldier who received the Silver Star or Medal of Honor who was named Bragg or Hood can be found. Say there was an infantryman named Hood whose heroic actions in Vietnam led to his receipt of an award for valor. Fort Hood maintains its name, but with a different namesake. If Private Hood was a minority, that would be even better. Perhaps the application of rational thought would be of benefit!

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