Joey Chenoweth mug

It’s easy to think of Maricopa as a brand new city. In many ways, when comparing its lifespan to everywhere else, this is true. But whether it feels this way or not, it is now approaching 20 years since the big subdivisions started moving into what was just a small farming town with a couple businesses for residents to visit. If the city was a person, it would be off in college changing its major for the third time because it’s afraid of graduating. In other words, it’s grown up, but not done becoming the entity it’s eventually going to look like after fully developing.

Welcome to Copacetic Magazine, where every three months we will be diving deep into what makes Maricopa a place where everybody has chosen to live. Residents here come from all over the country, and indeed the world, looking for opportunities they thought might have passed them by. This has created a diverse, dynamic culture that doesn’t always agree on specific topics but has almost miraculously formed a bond where everyone wants to work together to seek the best possible future for the community.

“Copacetic” basically means “it’s all good,” and we want to delve into all that makes Maricopa click. Sometimes that means tackling serious issues that are rising up in a growing community, while at other times celebrating how far everyone has come in such a short time. We’ll regularly feature what is going on in the world of health, education, the arts and community service, along with anyone who’s doing something cool around town. Have any ideas of people who should be featured, or topics you want us to cover? Feel free to email me at jchenoweth@pinalcentral.com.

In our inaugural issues, we are diving into what has made Maricopa what it is today: homes. While everything might look so new when driving through the city’s many neighborhoods, some of the first houses to be built here are now at the point where there is quite a lot of care needed to keep them working and maintaining property values. The homebuilder’s warranties on these houses have long expired, so it’s up to the owners to make the right decisions both for the wellbeing of the structures and their checking accounts.

But let’s not lose sight of the bright side, which is that with age comes maturity. Drive around one of the new neighborhoods popping up around town, and you’ll know what I mean. Everything might be new, but it looks it too. In an older neighborhood, some culture has started to flourish with how people decorate their homes, and more importantly how they handle their landscaping. In these pages, we take a look at some of the more creative looks at people’s houses, and the people who have dedicated much of their time to keeping yards and gardens looking good.

So dig into this first issue, and let us know what you think, and what we should include moving forward. Maricopa might be young, but it’s got a whole lot going on. So have fun, stay safe and keep it copacetic.

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